If you follow the Ubuntu channels, and unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu.

As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need all hands on deck to ensure that it does not only meet, but exceeds the high quality standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Rafael Carreras, from the Ubuntu Catalan LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

Our LoCo is language-oriented, and by language I mean Catalan (a Romanic one), not Perl or Python. In fact, the Catalan LoCo Team was the first language-oriented LoCo to be approved back in 2007. We manage our day-to-day in three mailing lists: technical doubts, team work and translations and do IRC meetings twice a month. We organise Ubuntu Global Jam events every 6 months (with some minor absences) and of course great release parties every 6 months along with some other little ones in between.

What kind of event are you organizing for this Ubuntu Global Jam?

As always, we will translate some new packages, discuss translation items, a bug triage session, some install release work and even evangelization to some passing people, as we organise UGJ this time in a civic centre.

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

No, it’s not, we are running UGJs since the first one and I think we only missed last one.

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

It’s a great opportunity for meeting people you only know by email or chat. Also, as we sit down together, there is little room for procrastination. Well, more or less, anyway.

Why do you think Jono Bacon always features pictures of the Catalan team when announcing the UGJ? Are we the most good-looking LoCo?

Yeah, definitely. It must be that.

Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

p1010458 by Alex Muntada

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu. As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need every hand on deck to ensure it not only meets but exceeds the standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Andrej Znidarsic, from the Ubuntu Slovenian LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

The Slovenian Ubuntu LoCo team was founded in 2005 and we try to spread Ubuntu mainly by translation work and help and support to Slovenian Ubuntu users who don’t have the means (either language or technical knowledger barrier) to solve problems themselves. Slovenian has been among the top translated languages for a while, which is quite impressive considering there are only 2 million native speakers and we don’t have a big pool to get translators from. We operate an IRC channel, website, forum, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ page. Offline we meet at monthly Ubuntu hours and we do Global Jams 🙂

What kind of event are you organizing for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam (UGJ)?

We are mostly going to focus on translations. This has traditionally been our strong point, as we exceeded 90% translation of Ubuntu about 2 years ago. Now we are focusing on translation quality and consistency. This time we want to put extra polish into translation for the LTS. In addition to that, a couple of people will focus on creating videos explaining how to perform basic tasks in Ubuntu (installing Ubuntu, Installing/removing software, Unity “tricks”…) and how to contribute to Ubuntu (how to start translating in Launchpad, how to report a bug, common translation mistakes in Slovenian). We will also be testdriving Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and report bugs we find on the way. More info can be found in our Ubuntu Global Jam announcement (in Slovenian only).

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

Nope. We have already organized 3 Ubuntu Global Jams. The first one was online only and the last two have been organized offline. We are quite lucky to have Kiberpipa, which has kindly been providing us a great venue with a lot of space and internet access. So we mostly need to do marketing of the event, coordinate transport and grab some pizzas :).

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

The results of previous UGJs have typically meant about 4000-5000 translated messages for us which is amazing for one day. Good translation coverage helps to grow Ubuntu usage in Slovenia. We have also managed to report a couple of bugs which improved overall quality. More importantly, in average about 15 people attend our global jam, so we meet and hang out with people we usually only see online. This vastly improves team cohesiveness. In addition there are always some newcomers, which is fantastic for community growth. Also, it’s fun :).
Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A Videocasts today!

Friday, February 24, 2012

Ubuntu Global Jam Q+A VideocastIn preparation for the Ubuntu Global Jam event next weekend, Jono and I will be running Q+A videocasts today

Jono’s videocast will be more convenient for the Americas and in the evening in Europe:

My videocast coming up in about 2 hours time and is more convenient for Europe and surrounding areas:

So if you are either thinking of organizing an event, you’re already organizing one, you’d like to participate in one, or simply want to learn more, do come along, ask your questions and have some fun!

Oh, and you should also check out the video about rolling your own event:

Can’t see it? Watch it here!

This Global Jam is going to be awesome, and it’s going to give that extra push to make Ubuntu 12.04 even a more rock-solid release. Have you already signed up for an event?

To ask your questions on the chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (it’s free, doesn’t take more than a couple of minutes and you can use your Launchpad OpenId), but I’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-locoteams IRC channel on Freenode.

Ubuntu Precise Open for Translation

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

I am pleased to announce that our current development release, Ubuntu Precise, is now open for translation:

Translate Ubuntu Oneiric!

Some additional information that will be useful for translators:

  • Translation schedule. Remember that according to the release schedule translatable messages might be subject to change until the User Interface Freeze on the week of the 23rd of February.
  • Language packs. During the development cycle, language packs containing translations will be released twice per week except for the freeze periods. This will allow users and translators to quickly see and test the results of translations.
  • Test and report bugs. If you notice any issues (e.g. untranslated strings or applications), do check with the translation team for your language first. If you think it is a genuine bug, please report it.
  • Learn more. Learn how to start translating Ubuntu and enable millions to use it in their language.

Ubuntu 12.04 will be a Long Term Support release, so let’s rally around translations to provide the best translated OS around and go over the mark of nearly 40 languages in which Ubuntu is fully translated!

open image by loop_oh – License: CC by-nd 2.0

One of the main objectives for the Ubuntu 12.04 cycle is to build upon the foundations set by the Ubuntu App Developer site, My Apps and the Ubuntu Software Centre and start building an Ubuntu App Developer community to realize the vision of a rich ecosystem of apps around Ubuntu. This is the first of a series of posts that will discuss several aspects of this goal, how to get involved, and the benefits of Ubuntu as a target platform for both developers and users.

An important aspect of each community is to ensure that there are easily accessible resources that can act as a venue for communication for anyone wanting to get involved. For the Ubuntu App Developer community, but also in general, the degree of involvement will then vary according to what the individuals connecting to our app developer story are looking for. Some will be seeking help, some will be able to provide help, some will want to contribute to build the developer story, some will want to stay up to date with the news, some will write applications… The first step is to ensure that we cover the main venues, or connecting points to our story for them.

We already started out creating some of these resources ready for the launch of the Ubuntu App Developer last cycle, but we’ve been adding some more recently and I thought at this point it would be a good opportunity to provide an overview of the variety of ways to get involved and stay up to date with App Development in Ubuntu. So without further ado…

Stay up to date

This is a set of channels to follow and share the news and announcements related to Ubuntu App Development.

The Ubuntu App Developer Blog – the official source for news, updates, new tutorials and other application development content in Ubuntu. You can read it and subscribe to it

Ubuntu App Developers on G+ – the Google+ page to for anyone interested in app development in Ubuntu to read and share updates. You can add it to your circles or +1 it

Ubuntu App Developers on Facebook – the Facebook page, also for enthusiasts of app development in Ubuntu to follow and comment on the latest news. You can like it.

Ubuntu App Developers on LinkedIn – the LinkedIn group for professionals wanting to know more about publishing their apps in the Software Centre. You can join it.

Ubuntu App Developers on Twitter – you prefer 140 character updates? @ubuntuappdev is also tweeting away in the microblogs world, spreading the news on Ubuntu App Development. You can follow it.

Ubuntu App Developers on Identi.ca – if your microblogging choice is the open source alternative to Twitter, Ubuntu app developers are also on identi.ca. You can follow it.

Get (or give) support

This is a set of channels to either get help, give help, or actively contribute to discussions related to Ubuntu App Development.

Ubuntu App Development on Askubuntu – the central place to get and provide support for all your app development questions. You can ask questions, answer questions, read the FAQ and subscribe to the questions feed.

Ubuntu App Development Mailing list – the list is also the place for support, but also for discussion of new topics, coordination of work and announcements related to building the Ubuntu App Developer story. You can subscribe to it or send e-mail.

Ubuntu App Development on IRC – for those seeking real-time support on text or simply a friendly chat amongst app developers. You can enter the IRC channel.

Contribute

This is an overview of some of the ways in which to contribute to the Ubuntu App Developer story.

Create an app – the most obvious way to make an impact is to actually create an app to be distributed to millions in the Software Centre. You can learn how to get started, how to publish, and actually publish your application. Also check out the video tutorial in how to get started in app development on Ubuntu in a matter of minutes.

Submit a tutorial – knowledge sharing is a key contribution to app development in Ubuntu. If you know about  an app development topic you’d like to see featured and shared in the Ubuntu App developer site, you can submit a tutorial.

Join the ARB – our vision is that both open source and commercial applications are the key to a successful app ecosystem in Ubuntu. The Application Review Board are a group of individuals committed to reviewing and helping open source apps thrive in this environment. If you have technical skills and want to contribute to this goal, they need your help.

All in all, this now gives no excuse not to know what’s going on in the app development world and to get involved. Now let’s get to work to have a stunning App Developer story!

 Social Media Icons by Paul Robert Lloyd

So now it’s the turn for the translations post!

For all of you interested in helping and being part of the effort of making Ubuntu available in any language, here’s a quick list with an overview of the Ubuntu Developer Summit sessions we’ve got in store this week.

Remember you can register your interest in sessions you want to attend or keep up to date with by using the Subscribe link on each session’s blueprint. The links in the list below will take you to the blueprints used to define the specifications for each feature or goal. You can also check out the full UDS schedule.

So, without further ado, here’s the list of translations sessions:

See you all there!

UDS is here again. Tomorrow another week packed with content that will define the plans for a new Ubuntu LTS release will start, and this time around application development will be a prominent topic.

So for all of you interested in helping and being part of the effort of making Ubuntu a platform of choice for application developers, here’s a quick list with an overview of the sessions we’ve got in store this week.

Remember you can register your interest in sessions you want to attend or keep up to date with by using the Subscribe link on each session’s blueprint. The links in the list below will take you to the blueprints used to define the specifications for each feature or goal. You can also check out the full UDS schedule.

So, without further ado, here’s the list of app development sessions:

Oh, and don’t miss the Application development and the Qt keynotes on Tuesday

See you all there!

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