Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 4

Friday, April 15, 2011

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 4 Summary

Ramping up to the end of the week we had another full app development goodness day, and one where the session topics fitted together in a nice workflow as well: creating bling, creating apps with Rapid Prototyping, getting them into Ubuntu, adding indicator support and translating them. Here’s the report of yesterday’s app development journey:

Qt Quick: Elements/Animations/States

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

The next Qt Quick session was all about creating attractive and usable user interfaces. Jürgen went through the QML tutorial documentation and code examples, showing us how to position elements with anchors, columns, rows and grids. Then onto states and transitions: describing the changes in an element’s properties and how to switch between them. To finalize, the most impressive stuff: QML animations, in which he teached us the different types of animations and how to use them.

Check out the session log here.

Qt Quick: Rapid Prototyping

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

In Jürgen’s words, Qt Quick was designed to bridge the gap between designers and developers, letting both groups to work with the same technologies and code base. He explained how Qt Creator provides a design mode which allows easy dragging and dropping of UI elements, and separation between code and interface. All through a natural and agile prototyping workflow.

Check out the session log here.

Rapid App Development with Quickly

By Michael Terry

Michael started introducing what Quickly at the heart is: a robust yet simple system of templates with boilerplate code and commands. The available templates are ubuntu-application, ubuntu-cli, ubuntu-pygame and ubuntu-flash-game, and on the Natty version, Quickly will feature the ‘submitubuntu’ command to help getting applications into the Software Center. All that being set straight, he then showed how to use Quickly and what it can do: from creating the first example application, to modifying the UI with ‘quickly design’ and Glade, into debugging and finally packaging.

Check out the session log here.

Getting Your App in the Distro: the Application Review Process

By Allison Randal

Linking from the previous session on how to create an app, Allison explained in a very clear way how to get your applications into Ubuntu, so that they make their way into the OS in a matter of weeks instead of having to wait until the next release. The first step is to submit a ticket to the App Review Board, giving them the essential details for the proposal. They’ll then do the initial review, in which one of the reviewers will volunteer to walk you through the process and help you with suggestions or improvements, to bring the app to a state ready for the final review. There the board will vote in a meeting for the inclusion of the application. After the process description she answered the questions from the audience and wrapped up with some useful tips to application submitters.

Check out the session log here.

Adding Indicator Support to your Apps

By Ted Gould

Ted kicked off with an explanation of what indicators are and their intended use: they should not be used just because they are available – rather as a feature for long running applications, those that are more services to users, to expose that functionality. The next step was to describe how to create indicators through libappindicator, with any language supported by GObject Introspection, such as Python or Javascript, and how to add more features to a basic indicator: accessible labels and attention state. After that he described fallbacks, and how platforms not using Unity can nevertheless use indicators. The final minutes were dedicated to the future of indicators, that for now will focus on API cleanup and stabilization, and introspection improvements.

Check out the session log here.

Using Launchpad to get your application translated –

By Henning Eggers

As a follow up to the talk on how to add native language support to your applications on Monday, Henning described the next step: how to make them translatable in Launchpad and grow a translation community around them. In the first part he showed how to set up a demo project using Launchpad’s staging server, and shared some recommendations on how to make sure the application is correctly set up for translations, followed by an overview on some Gettext concepts Launchpad relies upon. From there, it was straight into business: setting up a translatable project in Launchpad, getting translatable templates imported and exposed to translators, creating a translation community for your project and the workflow for translation. A very detailed overview to get your application to talk any language.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 5

The last day and the quality and variety of the sessions is still going strong. Check out the great content we’ve prepared for you today:

16:00 UTC
Qt Quick: Extend with C++ – Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel
Sometimes you would like to extend Qt Quick with your own native extension. Jürgen will show you some ways how to do it.

17:00 UTC
Phonon: Multimedia in Qt – Harald Sitter
Harald, as the lead developer of the Qt/KDE multimedia library Phoon will tell you about the awesomeness that Phonon provides and how it achieves ultimate portability, so that it can even run on vending machines. He’ll also tell you hos to create a video player with 3 lines of code (or in 30 seconds without any code) and much more.

18:00 UTC
Integrating music applications with the Sound Menu – Conor Curran
So you’ve seen the slick sound menu in Ubuntu, and you’re developing a multimedia application, right? You’re then wondering how to seamlessly integrate it into Ubuntu and use all the nice features from the menu as well? Wonder no more, for Conor is the man behind the sound menu and he’ll be delighted to teach you how.

19:00 UTC
pkgme: Automating The Packaging Of Your Project – James Westby
Once you’ve developed a cool application you’ll want to package it and distribute it to users so that they can easily install it in their favourite platform. James will show you how this can be both easy and fun letting pkgme do all the work for you.

20:00 UTC
Unity Technical Q&A – Jason Smith and Jorge Castro
You’ve heard about Unity, the new UI concept which is going to improve several orders of magnitude how you interact with your computer in Ubuntu. You are probably using it already, and you’ll surely have questions and will want to learn more about the coolness it brings. Jason Smith, from the Unity development team, and Jorge Castro, from the Community team know all about Unity and they’ll be here to chat with you.

21:00 UTC
Lightning Talks – Nigel Babu
As the final treat to close the week, Nigel has organized a series of lightning talks to showcase a medley of cool applications: CLI Companion, Unity Book Lens, Bikeshed, circleoffriends, Algorithm School, Sunflower FM, Tomahawk Player, Classbot – your app could be in this list next time, do check them out!

Looking forward to seeing you all there!

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 3

Thursday, April 14, 2011

Ubuntu App Developer Week – Day 3 Summary

Right into the middle of the week and still delivering the most diverse set of sessions from the most interesting technologies. QML, Cloud, D-Bus, Multitouch, Unity, Bazaar… Wednesday had a bit of everything. Most importantly, this sessions are for you all, so I was really glad to hear feedback on how people liked the content of App Developer Week! So here’s a new summary for all of those who couldn’t attend.

Qt Quick: QML the Language

By Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel

In his first session, Jürgen gave a short intro to Qt Quick’s QML language and how to use it. The first steps were to install Qt and Qt Creator, followed by a description of what Qt Quick is and how developers came up with a declarative way, similar to CSS or JSON to write in the language. All that clear, he then started with the Qt Quick tutorial and code examples that could be run with qmlviewer, the qml interpreter. Onto the second part, he focused on the QML languate, and going into the detail on how to create custom QML components. There were also lots of pointers to the excellent Qt documentation.

Check out the session log here.

Make your applications work in the cloud with Ubuntu One

By Stuart Langridge

Stuart gave a great overview on how to add the cloud to existing apps and how to make new apps for the cloud, letting Ubuntu One do all the hard work for you: from managing identities, password renewal to sharing data between applications. And all that on the web, the desktop, mobile… all your stuff everywhere! He then showed us some simple code to sync playlists on the cloud, ready for streaming. File sync is also an important Ubuntu One feature apps can make use of for sharing, and he also went through a couple of the many cool ways you can use it. The last mention was on API documentation, something Stuart is working on in this cycle.

Check out the session log here.

Take control of your desktop easily with DBus

By Alejandro J. Cura

In this session Alejandro showed us in a hands-on and easy to follow way different bits and pieces of D-Bus, and how applications in the desktop can communicate through it. He went through real life examples to show how to do simple tasks and explained how they can be achieved with D-Bus.

Check out the session log here.

Touchégg: Bringing Multitouch Gestures to your Desktop

In the second multitouch session of the week, app developer José Expósito started showcasing Touchégg, how it works and its features: recognizing multitouch gestures and getting the most of multitouch devices. He then went on describing which gestures it supports, such as tap, drag, pinch or tap & hold, and the different actions that can be associated to gestures, showing us a really cool video of Touchégg in action. The second part of the talk focused on describing the technologies used to develop Touchégg: uTouch-GEIS, through its simplified interface, and Qt.

By José Expósito

Check out the session log here.

Unity: Integrating with Launcher and Places

By Mikkel Kamstrup Erlandsen

Mikkel used the intro of the talk to set a couple of things straight: “Places” are going to be called “Lenses” in the next cycle, and libunity does not yet guarantee API or ABI stability. He then followed with the Unity Launcher integration, and how applications can use static quicklists, and more advanced features such as count, progress bar, window flashing and dynamic quicklists. The second part were Places: remote databases that provide data for Unity to render. Through a Python code example he showed us in detail all the aspects of creating a Unity Place.

Check out the session log here.

Tracking Source Code History with Bazaar

By Jelmer Vernooij

Jelmer, in his experience of seasoned Bazaar hacker started off introducing what bzr is: a modern distributed version control system. He then went on with the basics with a hands-on example, going through the creation of a branch, the first commit, and describing several of the most handy bzr commands. As a wrap-up, he showcased more advanced features such as source recipes: scripts that combine branches and build daily Debian packages from them.

Check out the session log here.

The Day Ahead: Upcoming Sessions for Day 4

We’re featuring a Qt Quick Marathon today: 2 sessions in a row. Following that, how to do RAD with yet another framework: Quickly, how to get your applications in Ubuntu, and how to get them translated in Launchpad. Enjoy!

16:00 UTC
Qt Quick: Elements/Animations/States – Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel
Another day and more featured Qt content: this time Jürgen will take us through different elements/animations and states Qt Quick provides, and will show us through examples how to make use of them.

17:00 UTC
Qt Quick: Rapid Prototyping – Jürgen Bocklage-Ryannel
If one session weren’t enough, here’s the continuation: more Qt goodness, this time a hands-on session to develop a small application from start to finish and experience the whole process from the front row.

18:00 UTC
Rapid App Development with QuicklyMichael Terry
Mike will show you how to write applications in no time with the power of Python and Quickly: bringing back the fun in programming.

19:00 UTC
Getting Your App in the Distro: the Application Review ProcessAllison Randal
A while back we created an easy process defining how to get applications into Ubuntu, so in order to be able to add them in a matter of weeks, rather than waiting for the next release. Allison, in her Ubuntu Technical Architect and Application Review Board member hat, will walk you through the Application Review Process

20:00 UTC
Adding Indicator Support to your AppsTed Gould
Join the man who knows most about indicators in a session that will teach you how to integrate your application even more into Ubuntu. They’re slick, robust and consistent: bringing indicator support to your apps.

21:00 UTC
Using Launchpad to get your application translatedHenning Eggers
One of the coolest features of Launchpad is that it helps growing a translation community around your project. You can make your application translatable in Launchpad and be able to deliver it into almost any language. Henning will teach you how to do this, picking up where the previous session on translations left.

Looking forward to seeing you all there!

Fabien has told me he’ll explain in more detail in a later post, but I couldn’t resist mentioning it in the meantime.

Look at this:

ast     1024
ca         5
cs        80
da        36
de       351
es       538
eu      3457
fi       293
fr        26
gl      3475
he       252
id       116
it        77
ka        98
ku       387
lt         3
nl       227
no        83
pt-BR    437
ro        18
ru       225
sl       537
sr       102
sv       382
ug      3378
zh-CN    537

TOTAL  16144

That’s more than 16000 strings in 26 languages coming from Launchpad landing on Chromium upstream.

Rock on.

Contribute to Chromium translations in Launchpad – if there is not yet a team for your language, you can create one.

Ubuntu Translations WorkflowUbuntu Translations TVJoin me in a fresh episode of Ubuntu Translations TV tomorrow, where I’ll be continuing the series started on the last session and explain what happens to translations when they get out of Launchpad and are delivered to our users for some localized goodness.

Again, this will be a bit technical, but not too much, and it will help everyone understanding the big picture of how translations work in Ubuntu.

As usual, feel free to participate and ask your questions!

Talk to you all tomorrow!

Note that if you wish to participate in the online chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (you can use your Launchpad OpenID), but I’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-translators IRC channel on Freenode.

Ubuntu Translations Videocast: Launchpad Translations NewsLots of translations news on the air this week!

Yesterday I had the pleasure to chat with the legendary Danilo Šegan, of Launchpad Translations and GNOME internationalization fame.

Danilo told us all about the progress on upstream integration work in Launchpad and explained more in detail the part which has just been freshly implemented for Ubuntu: better translation imports from upstream projects.

Do check it out here and stay tuned for the next Ubuntu Translations Videocast in a couple of weeks.

But that’s not all! This week  comes packed with translations content, as I got interviewed by Jono and had the opportunity to talk a bit about our amazing translation community.

It’s been a great week here in Dallas, but all good things come to an end. Next week back in business from home and we’ll leave the space to the Launchpad folk to discuss their master plan during the Launchpad Thunderdome. Rock on.

NOTE: this notice affects only translations for upstream projects in Launchpad, and not the translations of Ubuntu packages.

Yesterday’s Launchpad rollout came with lots of translation goodness, such as better upstream imports, of which we’ll talk in more detail very soon.

However, as a side effect and due to a migration script not being run in the Launchpad side, we’d like to ask you to wait a bit to do new translations for upstream projects in Launchpad until we can run this script again and make sure new translations during this time are not reverted to suggestions.

It should take about a day to run the script, and after that you can keep translating as usual. We’ll send a new notice when the run has finished.

Notice that no translations will be lost in any case, but if you do any translation between that period, they will be reverted to suggestions, meaning that you’ll have to re-approve them. We simply ask you not to translate to avoid this temporary situation, and save you the additional effort.

In summary:

  • Please refrain from translating upstream projects in Launchpad until further notice (in about a day’s time).
  • We only do this to make sure new translations are not reverted to suggestions and to save translators effort. No translation loss will happen in any case.
  • We’d like to ask you to forward this notice to your translation teams.
  • This does not affect Ubuntu packages. You can keep translating Ubuntu as usual.

As usual, if you’ve got any questions, please feel free to ask!


New Ubuntu Translations Videocast tomorrow

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Ubuntu Translations TVLadies and gents, I’m pleased to announce the next Ubuntu Translations videocast tomorrow from Dallas, Texas, where this week we are holding the Canonical Platform Rally for the next version of Ubuntu, the Natty Narwhal.

This time around I’ll have the privilege to be joined by Danilo Šegan (or his alter ego Данило Шеган), the Launchpad Translations developer team lead.

Those of you involved in translations will know Danilo well, not only for his work in developing the translations application in Launchpad, but also for his community involvement. A regular at UDS and GUADEC conferences, he’s also developed and maintained some of the key tools in the Free Software Localization ecosystem, such as xml2po and intltool.

He’ll be explaining all the cool new things coming up in Launchpad Translations, such as better upstream integration, and will also tell us a bit more about other changes affecting the way Launchpad is being developed.

As usual, we’ll be taking and answering your questions, so come and join us for a chat!

Note that if you wish to participate in the online chat, you’ll need to sign up for a ustream account (it doesn’t take more than a couple of minutes), but we’ll also be answering your questions on the #ubuntu-translators IRC channel on Freenode.

Talk to you all tomorrow!

Ubuntu Translations Videocast - Launchpad Translations News

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