Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam today

Thursday, December 13, 2012

Documents

It’s Community Docs Jam today!

We want to fix the www.ubuntu.com/community page to better represent our community, and who better than our community to help providing that content?

So join us today, pick an area where you’re interested and give us a hand adding content. Join the Ubuntu Community Docs Jam ›

Image: Binded Document CC-BY 2.0 by Sean MacEntee

After reading the Ubuntu App Showdown subreddit, getting a few pings on G+ and IRC, it seems there are some showdown participants concerned about whether their app made it on time for the contest.

So here’s a quick heads up: don’t worry, if your app was submitted to MyApps on time, and complied with the contest requirements, it made it to the contest. If some of the requirements were not met, we’ve probably contacted you and given you a chance to meet them, as we appreciate the hard work you’ve put these last 3 weeks, and we want you to get in.

Some of you have noticed there is a Trello board the Ubuntu App Review Board and their contributors have been using to track progress on app reviews. Some of the apps are still not in there simply because of the overwhelmingly positive response and the work it takes to process the about 150 contest submissions we got. About 90% of them are valid, and while it might take us a bit more than expected to process them, it is a very pleasant problem to have, to be honest :).

We’re currently finishing off the list of qualified apps and setting up the voting infrastructure, so we’ll publish the list of apps on the Ubuntu App Developer blog very soon.

In any case, good work to all of you who’ve participated. You’ve made it. In only 3 weeks you’ve gone from idea to a finished app using the Free Software tools Ubuntu puts on your hands. It is amazing, and even more for those of you who were new to app development in Ubuntu. I hope you’ve had fun and learnt a lot. Good luck with your apps during the jury vote!

Looking forward to start voting on all your awesome apps!

Image Don’t Panic Badge Attribution Some rights reserved by Jim Linwood

Just a heads up that in about 50 minutes, and as part of the Ubuntu Open Week, I’ll be talking again, this time about how to contribute translating Ubuntu.

So if you’re either interested in learning how to do it, or if you want to ask any questions, join me on IRC in the #ubuntu-classroom channel on Freenode.

See you there!

Just a heads up that in about 15 minutes, and as part of the Ubuntu Open Week, I’ll be talking about how to submit apps to the Software Centre.

So if you’re either interested in learning how to do it, or if you want to ask any questions, join me on IRC in the #ubuntu-classroom channel on Freenode.

See you there!

I’m thrilled to announce the availability of the Ubuntu 12.04 Online Tour for local community teams to localize and use on their websites. The tour has been the result of the stunning work done by Ant Dillon from the Canonical Web Design Team and should provide a web-based first impression of Ubuntu to new users, now in their language.

It’s a great opportunity to showcase Ubuntu to your local community to celebrate release day tomorrow.

Where is it?

How can I use it for my LoCo website?

First of all, you’ll need to get set up with the right tools before you start.

Getting set up:

If you’ve already translated the tour in Launchpad, you can build a localized version in 3 easy steps:

1. Get the code:

bzr branch lp:ubuntu-online-tour/12.04

2. Build the localized tour:

cd 12.04
cd translate-html/bin
./translate-html -t

3. Deploy the tour:

  • This will vary depending on your setup, so simply make sure you copy the chromeless, css, img, js, pie and videos folders along with the videoplayer.swf file to your site. In addition, you will need the en folder and the folder for your language created in the previous step.

If you haven’t finished the translation for your language in Launchpad, you will need to complete the corresponding PO file before you run step 2. Just ask on the Ubuntu translators mailing list or on Launchpad in case you need help or are not familiar with PO files.

For any issues, suggestions or enhancement, use the Online Tour’s Launchpad project to report bugs or submit improvements.

Enjoy!

If you follow the Ubuntu channels, and unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu.

As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need all hands on deck to ensure that it does not only meet, but exceeds the high quality standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Rafael Carreras, from the Ubuntu Catalan LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

Our LoCo is language-oriented, and by language I mean Catalan (a Romanic one), not Perl or Python. In fact, the Catalan LoCo Team was the first language-oriented LoCo to be approved back in 2007. We manage our day-to-day in three mailing lists: technical doubts, team work and translations and do IRC meetings twice a month. We organise Ubuntu Global Jam events every 6 months (with some minor absences) and of course great release parties every 6 months along with some other little ones in between.

What kind of event are you organizing for this Ubuntu Global Jam?

As always, we will translate some new packages, discuss translation items, a bug triage session, some install release work and even evangelization to some passing people, as we organise UGJ this time in a civic centre.

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

No, it’s not, we are running UGJs since the first one and I think we only missed last one.

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

It’s a great opportunity for meeting people you only know by email or chat. Also, as we sit down together, there is little room for procrastination. Well, more or less, anyway.

Why do you think Jono Bacon always features pictures of the Catalan team when announcing the UGJ? Are we the most good-looking LoCo?

Yeah, definitely. It must be that.

Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!

p1010458 by Alex Muntada

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you’ll have noticed that this coming weekend we’re organizing the Ubuntu Global Jam, a worldwide event where Ubuntu local community teams (LoCos) join in a get-together fest to have some fun while improving Ubuntu. As we’re ramping up to a Long Term Support release, this is a particularly important UGJ and we need every hand on deck to ensure it not only meets but exceeds the standard of previous Ubuntu LTS releases. This is another article in the series of blog posts showcasing the events our community is organizing, brought to you by Andrej Znidarsic, from the Ubuntu Slovenian LoCo team.

Tell us a bit about your LoCo team

The Slovenian Ubuntu LoCo team was founded in 2005 and we try to spread Ubuntu mainly by translation work and help and support to Slovenian Ubuntu users who don’t have the means (either language or technical knowledger barrier) to solve problems themselves. Slovenian has been among the top translated languages for a while, which is quite impressive considering there are only 2 million native speakers and we don’t have a big pool to get translators from. We operate an IRC channel, website, forum, Facebook, Twitter and Google+ page. Offline we meet at monthly Ubuntu hours and we do Global Jams :)

What kind of event are you organizing for the upcoming Ubuntu Global Jam (UGJ)?

We are mostly going to focus on translations. This has traditionally been our strong point, as we exceeded 90% translation of Ubuntu about 2 years ago. Now we are focusing on translation quality and consistency. This time we want to put extra polish into translation for the LTS. In addition to that, a couple of people will focus on creating videos explaining how to perform basic tasks in Ubuntu (installing Ubuntu, Installing/removing software, Unity “tricks”…) and how to contribute to Ubuntu (how to start translating in Launchpad, how to report a bug, common translation mistakes in Slovenian). We will also be testdriving Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and report bugs we find on the way. More info can be found in our Ubuntu Global Jam announcement (in Slovenian only).

Is this the first UGJ event you’re organizing?

Nope. We have already organized 3 Ubuntu Global Jams. The first one was online only and the last two have been organized offline. We are quite lucky to have Kiberpipa, which has kindly been providing us a great venue with a lot of space and internet access. So we mostly need to do marketing of the event, coordinate transport and grab some pizzas :).

How do you think UGJ events help the Ubuntu community and Ubuntu?

The results of previous UGJs have typically meant about 4000-5000 translated messages for us which is amazing for one day. Good translation coverage helps to grow Ubuntu usage in Slovenia. We have also managed to report a couple of bugs which improved overall quality. More importantly, in average about 15 people attend our global jam, so we meet and hang out with people we usually only see online. This vastly improves team cohesiveness. In addition there are always some newcomers, which is fantastic for community growth. Also, it’s fun :).
Join the party by registering your event at the Ubuntu LoCo Portal!
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